Episode 30, Friedrich Nietzsche - with Mark Linsenmayer and Gregory Sadler (Part II)

Welcome to Episode 30 (Part II of II) on Friedrich Nietzsche with Mark Linsenmayer and Dr Gregory Sadler.

Born in Rocken, in Prussia in 1844, Nietzsche set out his career in philology but later turned to writing idiosyncratic philosophical treatise and collections of aphorisms. He directed these against the pious dogmas of Christianity and traditional philosophy. He saw both as self-serving veils drawn over the harsher realities of life. He felt we needed not a high moral or theological ideals but a deeply critical form of cultural genealogy that would uncover the reasons why we humans are as we are and how we have come to be this way. He believed that every great philosopher actually a kind of involuntary and unconscious memoir rather than conducting an impersonal search for knowledge. Studying our own moral genealogy cannot help us escape or transcend ourselves but it can enable us to see our illusions more clearly and lead a more vital, assertive existence. 

There is no God in this picture. The human beings who created God have also killed him. It is now up to us alone. The way to live is not to throw ourselves into faith but into our own lives, conducting them in affirmation of every moment, exactly as it without wishing anything was different and without harbouring resentment for others or our fate (Sarah Bakewell, The Existentialist Cafe, p.19-20).

This week in Part II, we'll be looking at what Nietzsche can teach us, as well as engaging in some further analysis and discussion. 

Share your thoughts and feedback @thepanpsycast.

The file size is large, please be patient whilst the podcast buffers/downloads/becomes the Übermensch

Part I. What is the philosophical underpinning of Nietzsche? (36:40 in Part I)

Part II. An Introduction to Nietzsche’s Thought (50:00 in Part I)

Part III. What can Nietzsche teach us? (00:05 in Part II)

Part IV. Further Analysis and Discussion. (28:15 in Part II)


Episodes 29-31 are proudly supported by New College of the Humanities. To find out more about the college and their philosophy programmes, please visit www.nchlondon.ac.uk/panpsycast


Episode 30, Friedrich Nietzsche - with Mark Linsenmayer and Gregory Sadler (Part I)

Welcome to Episode 30 (Part I of II) on Friedrich Nietzsche with Mark Linsenmayer and Dr Gregory Sadler.

Born in Rocken, in Prussia in 1844, Nietzsche set out his career in philology but later turned to writing idiosyncratic philosophical treatise and collections of aphorisms. He directed these against the pious dogmas of Christianity and traditional philosophy. He saw both as self-serving veils drawn over the harsher realities of life. He felt we needed not a high moral or theological ideals but a deeply critical form of cultural genealogy that would uncover the reasons why we humans are as we are and how we have come to be this way. He believed that every great philosopher actually a kind of involuntary and unconscious memoir rather than conducting an impersonal search for knowledge. Studying our own moral genealogy cannot help us escape or transcend ourselves but it can enable us to see our illusions more clearly and lead a more vital, assertive existence. 

There is no God in this picture. The human beings who created God have also killed him. It is now up to us alone. The way to live is not to throw ourselves into faith but into our own lives, conducting them in affirmation of every moment, exactly as it without wishing anything was different and without harbouring resentment for others or our fate (Sarah Bakewell, The Existentialist Cafe, p.19-20).

This week in Part I, we'll be looking at the thinkers who influenced Nietzsche, as well as introducing you to his philosophy. 

Share your thoughts and feedback @thepanpsycast.

The file size is large, please be patient whilst the podcast buffers/downloads/becomes the Übermensch

Part I. What is the philosophical underpinning of Nietzsche? (36:40 in Part I)

Part II. An Introduction to Nietzsche’s Thought (50:00 in Part I)

Part III. What can Nietzsche teach us? (00:05 in Part II)

Part IV. Further Analysis and Discussion. (28:15 in Part II)


Episodes 29-31 are proudly supported by New College of the Humanities. To find out more about the college and their philosophy programmes, please visit www.nchlondon.ac.uk/panpsycast


Episode 18, Albert Camus (Part II)

Welcome to Episode 18 (Part II of II) on Albert Camus.

Albert Camus (1913-1960) is perhaps the most read philosopher of the 20th century. Camus is generally considered to be the father of absurdism, the idea that life's meaning is beyond our reach and that we should embrace what he called the absurd. Given the extraordinary number of people that have read Camus' work, it is no surprise that he is one of the most romanticised philosophers to have lived. In this two-part special on Camus, we're going to be asking questions like; Who was Albert Camus? Is life worth living? What is the absurd? And How should we deal with the absurd?

This week we'll be talking about Camus' response to the absurd and the sociological aspect of suicide.

As always, you can find the main texts as well as links to additional content at the bottom of the page. Please help support the show by subscribing on iTunesAndroid or tunein. Thank you!

Any thoughts? Please tweet us @thepanpsycast or email us at jack@thepanpsychist.com.

The file size is large, please be patient whilst the podcast buffers/downloads/has to walk down the hill to push the boulder back up again
Part I. The Life of Camus (04:20)
Part II. The Absurd (16:40)
Part III. Camus' Response to the Absurd (00:10 in Part II)
Part IV. The Sociological Aspect of Suicide, Further Analysis and Discussion (15:25 in Part II)

Episode 18, Albert Camus (Part I)

Welcome to Episode 18 (Part I of II) on Albert Camus.

Albert Camus (1913-1960) is perhaps the most read philosopher of the 20th century. Camus is generally considered to be the father of absurdism, the idea that life's meaning is beyond our reach and that we should embrace what he called the absurd. Given the extraordinary number of people that have read Camus' work, it is no surprise that he is one of the most romanticised philosophers to have lived. In this two-part special on Camus, we're going to be asking questions like; Who was Albert Camus? Is life worth living? What is the absurd? And How should we deal with the absurd?

This week we'll be talking about Camus' life and the absurd.

As always, you can find the main texts as well as links to additional content at the bottom of the page. Please help support the show by subscribing on iTunesAndroid or tunein. Thank you!

Any thoughts? Please tweet us @thepanpsycast or email us at jack@thepanpsychist.com.

The file size is large, please be patient whilst the podcast buffers/downloads/pushes the boulder back up the hill
Part I. The Life of Camus (04:20)
Part II. The Absurd (16:40)
Part III. Camus' Response to the Absurd (00:10 in Part II)
Part IV. Further Analysis and Discussion (15:25 in Part II)

Episode 17, Jean-Paul Sartre (Part II)

Welcome to Episode 17 (Part II of II) on Jean-Paul Sartre.

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Jean-Paul Sartre (1905-1980) was arguably the most influential philosopher of the 20th century. The quintessential existentialist, Sartre encapsulates the very essence of existentialism through his various philosophical works and plays. Sartre still has much to teach us. Still, Sartre would argue too many people live in Bad faith. They ignore that they are "condemned to be free". Amongst other things, we'll be asking, Why did 50,000 people attend his funeral? Are we condemned to be free? And Are we living in bad faith?

This week we'll be talking about what it is to be living in bad faith and engaging in some further analysis and discussion.

As always, you can find the main texts as well as links to additional content at the bottom of the page. Please help support the show by subscribing on iTunes, Android or tunein. Thank you!

Any thoughts? Please tweet us @thepanpsycast or email us at jack@thepanpsychist.com.

The file size is large, please be patient whilst the podcast buffers/downloads/realises it is still living in bad faith
Part I. The Life of Sartre (03:35)
Part II. "Man is condemned to be free" (18:15)
Part III. Bad Faith (00:10 in Part II)
Part IV. Further Anaylsis and Discussion (31:40 in Part II)

Episode 17, Jean-Paul Sartre (Part I)

Welcome to Episode 17 (Part I of II) on Jean-Paul Sartre.

Jean-Paul Sartre (1905-1980) was arguably the most influential philosopher of the 20th century. The quintessential existentialist, Sartre encapsulates the very essence of existentialism through his various philosophical works and plays. Sartre still has much to teach us. Still, Sartre would argue too many people live in Bad faith. They ignore that they are "condemned to be free". Amongst other things, we'll be asking, Why did 50,000 people attend his funeral? Are we condemned to be free? And Are we living in bad faith?

This week we'll be talking about the life of Jean-Paul Sartre and what Sartre meant when he said, "man is condemned to be free".

As always, you can find the main texts as well as links to additional content at the bottom of the page. Please help support the show by subscribing on iTunesAndroid or tunein. Thank you!

Any thoughts? Please tweet us @thepanpsycast or email us at jack@thepanpsychist.com.

The file size is large, please be patient whilst the podcast buffers/downloads/realises it is living in bad faith
Part I. The Life of Sartre (03:35)
Part II. "Man is condemned to be free" (18:15)
Part III. Bad Faith (00:10 in Part II)
Part IV. Further Anaylsis and Discussion (31:40 in Part II)

Episode 16, Søren Kierkegaard (Part III)

Welcome to Episode 16 (Part III of III) on Søren Kierkegaard.

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Søren Kierkegaard (1813-1855) was a man who did not consider himself a philosopher but rather a poet. He showed distain to the rigid academic systems that theology and philosophy were producing during his time, and his writings were often in complete opposition to their way of thinking. For Kierkegaard, the importance of philosophy lay with self-discovery; developing into a true, authentic self.

This week we talk about Sickness Unto Death and engage in some further analysis and discussion.

As always, you can find the main texts as well as links to additional content at the bottom of the page.

Thank you for listening! Any thoughts? Please tweet us @thepanpsycast!

The file size is large, please be patient whilst the podcast buffers/downloads/takes a leap of faith
Part I. The Life of Kierkegaard (11:11)
Part II. The Basis of Kierkegaard's Philosophy (32:35)
Part III. The Three Spheres of Life (00:10 in Part II)
Part IV. Further Analysis and Discussion (00:10 in Part III)

Episode 16, Søren Kierkegaard (Part II)

Welcome to Episode 16 (Part II of III) on Søren Kierkegaard.

Cast.jpg

Søren Kierkegaard (1813-1855) was a man who did not consider himself a philosopher but rather a poet. He showed distain to the rigid academic systems that theology and philosophy were producing during his time, and his writings were often in complete opposition to their way of thinking. For Kierkegaard, the importance of philosophy lay with self-discovery; developing into a true, authentic self.

This week we dive into Kierkegaard's 'Spheres of Life', focusing on his books Either / Or and Fear and Trembling.

As always, you can find the main texts as well as links to additional content at the bottom of the page.

Thank you for listening! Any thoughts? Please tweet us @thepanpsycast!

The file size is large, please be patient whilst the podcast buffers/downloads/takes a leap of faith
Part I. The Life of Kierkegaard (11:11)
Part II. The Basis of Kierkegaard's Philosophy (32:35)
Part III. The Three Spheres of Life (00:10 in Part II)
Part IV. Further Analysis and Discussion (00:10 in Part III)

Episode 16, Søren Kierkegaard (Part I)

Cast.jpg

Welcome to Episode 16 (Part I of III) on Søren Kierkegaard.

Søren Kierkegaard (1813-1855) was a man who did not consider himself a philosopher but rather a poet. He showed distain to the rigid academic systems that theology and philosophy were producing during his time, and his writings were often in complete opposition to their way of thinking. For Kierkegaard, the importance of philosophy lay with self-discovery; developing into a true, authentic self.

This week we take a look at the life of Kierkegaard and the basis of his philosophy.

As always, you can find the main texts as well as links to additional content at the bottom of the page.

Thank you for listening! Any thoughts? Please tweet us @thepanpsycast!

The file size is large, please be patient whilst the podcast buffers/downloads/takes a leap of faith

Part I. The Life of Kierkegaard (11:11)
Part II. The Basis of Kierkegaard's Philosophy (32:35)
Part III. The Three Spheres of Life (00:10 in Part II)
Part IV. Further Analysis and Discussion (00:10 in Part III)